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Digital Bridges 2015 Summer Institute

To prepare for the Institute, we encourage you to read/view the following. Most are short blog entries. This will help us to begin developing a shared vocabulary.

Adeline Koh, “Introducing Digital Humanities Work to Undergraduates: An Overview”

http://www.hybridpedagogy.com/journal/introducing-digital-humanities-work-undergraduates-overview/

Timothy Burke, “The Humane Digital”

http://blogs.swarthmore.edu/burke/blog/2013/05/03/the-humane-digital/

Mark Sample, “5 BASIC Statements on Computational Literacy”

http://enculturation.camden.rutgers.edu/book/export/html/5269

Alan Liu, “Where Is Cultural Criticism in the Digital Humanities?”

http://dhdebates.gc.cuny.edu/debates/text/20

“Key Trends in the Digital Humanities” (Liu’s current book project)

Video (1 hour) https://vimeo.com/121191996

Monday: Introductions, exhibitions, and collections 

Meet in The Noyce Science Center, Room 1023

link to map of campus

Organizer: Jim Elmborg
9:00-10:30 Facilitated discussion about the workshop Plan for the week–daily structure for the workshop.

  • Mornings–introduction to a specific technology and examples of how the speaker and others are using the technology in the classroom.
  • Afternoons–presenters will walk us through building something simple using the technology in hands on workshops.
  • End each day with reflections on what we’ve covered and questions about pedagogical value of the technology. What would you want students to be able to do? As we work together through the week, what questions and concerns do we want to keep in mind?

Introductions

We are counting on all of us reading the online bios of participants; therefore, our introductions will focus on the courses each of us plans to develop or re-imagine.

10:30-10:45 Break
10:45-12:00 Developing collections with OMEKAPresenter, Lindsay Mattock, School of Library and Information Science, University of Iowa, Monessa Cummins, Department Chair of Classics, Grinnell College and Sara Ramey, student at Grinnell College

Omeka is an open source web-publishing and collection management tool designed for libraries, archives, and museums.  During this session we will discuss the use of Omeka.net, Omeka’s web-based platform, for the creation of scholarly collections in the classroom. The workshop will include a detailed tutorial of how to build digital collections in Omkea, how to create contextual metadata and description of collection items, and how to build digital exhibits and tell stories with digital collections. This session will also discuss potential classroom uses of Omeka through the exploration of use-cases, address the development of assignments and assessment criteria, and consider potential copyright issues regarding the reuse of digital materials. Participants will curate individual Omeka sites using the Grinnell College Libraries’ Digital Collections to explore the functions and capabilities of Omeka during the workshop.
Monessa Cummins, Associate Professor, Department Chair of Classics, Grinnell College will discuss her use of Omkea in the classroom with her TA Sara Ramey.  The Roman Art and Archaeology Omeka site from her course can be found at: http://omeka1.grinnell.edu/Classics/ 
Visit the OMEKA Showcase before we meet to see more sample collections and exhibits.
12:00-1:00 Lunch
1:00-3:30 OMEKA Workshop–Provide an introduction to Omeka, including adding items, building collections, and designing exhibits. Introduce digital collections at Grinnell and UI that may be used for Omeka projects. Brainstorm other uses of Omeka in the classroom, including the development of class assignments and assessment criteria. Discuss the key rights issues to consider when building digital collections.
3:30-4:00 Reflection What humanities questions can this tool help explore or answer? Potential classroom applications: what would you want students to be able to do and why?
4:00-4:30 Hands-on time on your own 

Tuesday: Mapping 

Meet in The Noyce Science Center, Room 1023

Organizer: Erik Simpson
9:00-9:15 Introduction to Visitors: Personal Data Map
9:15 – 10:00 History of GIS and its Use in Academia, Rob Shepard, University of Iowa Libraries
10:00 – 10:30 Using Maps in Research and in the Classroom, Sarah Bond, Classics Department, University of Iowa
10:30 – 10:45 break
10:45 – 12:00 Making maps, saving files, and visualizing your data
Sarah Bond, Classics Department, University of Iowa
12:00 -1:00 Lunch
1:00 – 3:00 Mapping Workshop
3:00 – 3:30 Taking Geospatial Research to the Next Level 
3:30 – 4:00 Reflection What humanities questions can this tool help explore or answer? Potential classroom applications: what would you want students to be able to do and why?
4:00 – 4:30 Hands-on time on your own 

Wednesday: Text Analysis

Meet in The Noyce Science Center, Room 1023

Organizer: Erik Simpson
9:00 – 9:30 Introductions to Visitors
10:30 -12:00 Text Analysis Presenter – Ted Underwood, Department of English, University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign How can students use ‘R’ as a text analysis tool?Topic Modeling and platforms. Ready made platforms for topic modeling.
12:00-1:00 Lunch
1:00-3:30 Text Analysis Workshop
3:30-4:00 Reflection What humanities questions can this tool help explore or answer? Potential classroom applications: what would you want students to be able to do and why?
4:00-4:30 Hands-on time on your own 

Thursday: 3D Environment Modeling

Meet in The Noyce Science Center, Room 1023

Organizer: Jim Elmborg
9:00-9:15 Introduction to Visitors
9:00 – 12:00 3D Visualization Presentation – Bob Cargill, Departments of Classics and Religious Studies, University of IowaAn introduction to modeling theory, discussing the importance of modeling in the modern classroom, best practices for creating and presenting models accurately and efficiently, and potential classroom applications where models make the most sense
12:00-1:00 Lunch
1:00-2:45 3D Visualization Workshop – Bob Cargill, University of Iowa, and Cale Staley, Cornell University A hands-on Google SketchUp workshop co-taught by Cale Staley (Iowa MA alum and Cornell University PhD student) and me, where participants will be introduced to the free software, and will learn how to create and texture digital models for use in Google Earth.For samples, please see the SketchUp Gallery (https://3dwarehouse.sketchup.com) or my Virtual Qumran project (virtualqumran.com) or the Digital Karnak project (http://dlib.etc.ucla.edu/projects/Karnak/) for examples of models used to portray ancient worlds.
2:45-3:00 Break
3:00-4:00 Preparing for tomorrow’s small group presentations: “speed-dating” mobile conversations about what people plan to present the next day about the ways you might incorporate technologies we’ve discussed into a class.
4:00-4:30 Reflection–What humanities questions can this tool help explore or answer? Potential classroom applications: what would you want students to be able to do and why?
6:30 Dinner at Prairie Canary 

Friday: Project Presentations 

Meet in The Noyce Science Center, Room 1023

9:00 – 11:00 Small Group Project Presentations–Divide into 3 groups. Describe your course plans and how you imagine using technology. Note resources and support you’ll need. Keep comments under 5-7 minutes. Each group will have a timekeeper and note taker.
11:00-12:00 Project Presentation Conversation–Introduction to our new SITAS–Reuben Vyn and Mariana Colombo.Reuben and Mariana will explain what SITAs do and how they can help. What questions should we have in mind as we listen to each others’ class plans? For example–How does the technology further the aims of the course? What will students need to learn about the technology to succeed? How can the SITAS assist you in planning and teaching your course? What other support or resources will you need?
12:00-1:00 Lunch
1:00-2:00 Reflection– Jean Florman, from the University of Iowa Center for Teaching, will explain the role of the Center for Teaching. What humanities questions could the tools we’ve discussed help your students explore or answer? How can you clarify your learning objectives—the intellectual connection between the use of digital technology and what you want students to learn about subject matter, skills, etc.—for students? What can your students accomplish using the technology that they could not accomplish otherwise?
2:30-4:00 Week Wrap Up–Full group discussion–report out including patterns, themes, and recurring issues that have emerged over the week. Evaluate the institute. Schedule “reunion” when we will meet early in the fall to discuss your course plans and other developments.